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Firefox eats your SSD, writes tens of GB per day If you use Firefox on your SSD, you should read carefully now. Browser, by default, wipes the flash chips with a number of entries. Unnecessarily tens of gigabytes are stored on the disk. Today's modern multi-core processors and a large amount of memory allow you to open more and more pages in one browser. But it has an unintended impact on the life of the SSD, because they are postponing data about the open pages. Daily numbers may be relatively large. Firefox The problem in Firefox was discovered by Sergei Bobik and described by ServeTheHome. SSDLife has been tracking SSD writes for two days, surprisingly, that 12GB of data is written on the disk each day. He said he did not download any large files and only used a browse..

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Firefox eats your SSD, writes tens of GB per day

If you use Firefox on your SSD, you should read carefully now. Browser, by default, wipes the flash chips with a number of entries. Unnecessarily tens of gigabytes are stored on the disk.

Today's modern multi-core processors and a large amount of memory allow you to open more and more pages in one browser. But it has an unintended impact on the life of the SSD, because they are postponing data about the open pages. Daily numbers may be relatively large.

Firefox

The problem in Firefox was discovered by Sergei Bobik and described by ServeTheHome. SSDLife has been tracking SSD writes for two days, surprisingly, that 12GB of data is written on the disk each day. He said he did not download any large files and only used a browser and a mail client. So he started watching the situation for a long time and it turned out to be a stagnant situation. Even an unused open-source computer writes 10GB of data per day.

While watching the system, Firefox writes practically constantly into the recovery.js files and cookies * between 300 KB and 2 MB per second. This is the file from which the session is restored after the browser or system crashes. Browser does not write changes to it incrementally but continually overwrites it. This generates a large bit rate that consumes memory chips in the SSD.

Interestingly, Pale Blue browser does not suffer from this problem. Although it comes out of Firefox, it uses the older version code. Firefox, in version 33, introduced a new session manager, which is significantly more aggressive in the entries and causes the above problem.

Solve the problem - Change settings

The solution is to change the interval after which Firefox regularly stores the status of the current session into the file. By default, Firefox has 15 seconds (15,000 ms), which allows you to recover a few seconds of old work in the event of a failure, but it leads to the above mentioned entries.

If you want to change the settings, insert the about: config in the address bar and look for the browser.sessionstore.interval entry, which you can reasonably increase. Sergei Bobik increased the interval to 30 minutes, which led to a decrease in daily registrations to significantly lower 2 GB.

The second option is to completely disable this feature. In the same menu of advanced settings, you need to right-click, select New Preference → Logic from the menu and create browser.sessionstore.enabled and set its contents to false.

Firefox is probably not alone

The original article only applies to Firefox, but other users have the same problem with other browsers. For example, Chrome is able to write about 1 GB per hour for 80 open panels, with cookies accounting for about a fifth of that volume.

In the discussion under the original article, another user complains about a similar behavior of the Vivaldi browser. In any case, this problem is not dependent on the operating system you are using. On the other hand, it depends on the particular user and his/her way of working with the browser - if the work is more intense and more panels are open, the browser will store more data.

Is this really a problem?

The question is whether this is a real problem or at least how much such behavior threatens SSDs. At the cheapest TLC discs, manufacturers are guaranteed only a few thousand transcripts per cell. Specifically, OCZ recommends that at least 120 GB of 27 GB of data per day be recommended. If half of this volume consumes an open browser, it can be a problem.

On the other hand, various practical tests have shown that the SSD actually endures far more entries than guaranteed. Even if it did, it's useless to get rid of the cells unnecessarily, regardless of the downward performance of the busy disk.



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